Apple's advertising and marketing crews would love to have all of us believe that Mac users are more hip, cool and stylish than PC users. But is this true? Are Mac users more fashionable than PC users?

Bundle.com recently did a study on this, and here's what they found:

"Mac buyers tend to shop at luxury stores and they like their labels (especially Jimmy Choo, one of Carrie Bradshaw's favorite brands). That's not to say PC users aren't fashion-forward: They also like to peruse the racks at Bloomingdale’s, but they’re less inclined to whip out their credit cards than Mac users.

Rather than shell out a few hundred dollars for a pair of stilettos, PC buyers prefer to shop at more modest price points. The PC segment likes to shop at popular retail stores: They prefer Old Navy, Perry Ellis and Nautica over Barney's, Hermes and Burberry. PC users tend to wear clothes as reasonably priced as their computers.

Apple computers are notoriously more expensive than PCs, and Mac users generally have more money to spend. Forty percent of the anonymous Mac users we examined earned more than $100,000, while twenty-nine percent of PC users made six figures or more.

But Mac users still hunt for bargains. Mac buyers are more inclined to search for bargains in upscale shops, or they’ll track down the labels they love in outlets or on the clearance racks. Mac users work hard to scour the shelves for stylish goods at everywoman price points at outlets: They like to shop at Last Call by Neiman Marcus, Thomas Pink outlets, and Coach outlets. PC users tend to hit Van Heusen and Columbia Sportswear when they’re at the outlets.

Based on our results, there is some truth to the hip, fashion-forward Mac user stereotype. As for PC users, our data shows that they're not stereotypically dull, just more mainstream."

What do you think? Do you agree? Comment on our post and let you know what you think!

To read more about Bundle.com's study, click here.

This is published with permission from Bundle.com, a NYC-based startup that helps people find the best restaurants, bars and shops in their cities and at their price points by analyzing billions of anonymous, aggregated credit card transactions.

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